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Part 6

Submission

Looking Sideways

Women and Children in Colossians

Old rules, new relationships

Piglets aren’t "in Christ"!

 

Submission is a problem. Well, it is for me. I do not submit easily. I’m a child of my time. I like to be in control - independent, that’s me. In the face of a culture that abhors submission, or worse enjoys and demands it, while despising those who submit, to discuss the biblical understanding of the roles of men and women in terms of submission is difficult.

Yet it’s there in the Word. Husbands seeking control of their wives have several favourite passages available. 1 Cor 14:33ff. and 1 Tim 2:11 are champion, as they ordain silence on the wife’s part - any discussion of the master’s will is therefore rebellion against God! (Dictators love laws silencing those they rule!)

For those with an open mind, when addressing difficult and contentious issues, it often helps to approach them sideways. That’s what the Master often did when the lawyers came to him with their conundrums and awkward questions.

Looking Sideways

"Where" and "when" the Bible discusses the submission of women to men is interesting. Although the cultures of Bible times were thoroughly patriarchal, the Two-Thirds Bible (Old Testament) seems silent on the need for women to submit. So, too are the Gospels. For the Gospel writers, focusing on Jesus life and teaching leaves no time for details of family organisation. (Can you imagine Jesus telling women to be quite and keep their place!) While in the centuries BC most women and men "knew their place" and so there was little to discuss. Discussion of submission in the Epistles is due to the growth of city life in the Roman empire, which challenged the old patterns of living and made the issue a live one, much as currents of liberation have reopened it in our world.

I spoke of the cultures of the Bible as "patriarchal". This word deserves a second glance. In our culture patriarchy is a swear-word to the PC. In the ancient world, patriarchy meant that each household had one person whose job was to guide, protect and defend. The cultures of the Bible are family (= whanau, not the European style 2+2.4) and clan based.

One’s place in the world came from membership of a family. Even legal protection depended on having a family member to speak in council on your behalf. The Old Testament lists four groups who need special care and protection: widows, orphans, foreigners and the "poor". Notice that two of these (or three if you count the foreigners) are those who are deprived of a "paterfamilias" - a household head to defend their interests.

In patriarchy each person has their role, women run the home, youths run the business or keep the flocks, each obeys the paterfamilias (including adult male family members) who must defend the interests of all. Men are no different from women in this obedience they owe. This is the context of talk, in the epistles, of "submission" as the role of children and women - it is no longer how we live.

Women and Children in Colossians

New Testament advice about family relationships, and the duties and responsibilities of members of a household is closely related to the advice found in Jewish and Greek authors of the same period. In all three contexts wives, children and slaves are encouraged to obey or "submit" to the head of the household (paterfamilias). But it is not these similarities that are interesting - it’s the differences.

On the surface the most striking difference in Christian advice (at least to husbands, wives and children) is the phrase "in Christ" or "in the Lord".

So in Col 3 Paul writes: "Wives, be subject to your husbands, as is fitting in the Lord." And "Children, obey your parents in everything, for this is your acceptable duty in the Lord". (Col 3:18,20).

So, family relationships are governed by the same rules for Christians as for Jewish or Pagan households but with an added element. Wife and husband, parent and child are all "in Christ". As fellow members of the "body of Christ" there is a new and different aspect given to the old rules. (No such phrase qualifies the advice to slaves, for their masters may not share this new relationship "in Christ".)

Old rules, new relationships

In their families as elsewhere Christians are to abide by the rules and norms of respectable society. Here as elsewhere too, something new is introduced by the Gospel. In Colossians 3 Paul expresses the newness like this:

 Conventional Behaviour:

 Gospel Innovation:
8 Wives, be in subjection to your husbands, 19 Husbands, love your wives, and be not bitter against them.
20 Children, obey your parents in all things, 21 Fathers, provoke not your children, that they be not discouraged.

The paterfamilias was "head" of the household. In many families of the ancient world this meant their word was law and their whims were obeyed. Christian "headship" is modelled by Jesus. I wonder what kind of paterfamilias copied the Lord who: "emptied himself, taking the form of a servant… humbled himself, becoming obedient even unto death, yea, the death of the cross" (Phil 2:7-8).

Piglets aren’t "in Christ"!

How sad sometimes to hear Christian women seeking "liberation" in ways that fail to reflect the creator’s dreams for humankind. Too often the cry for women’s liberation (even in the Church) reflects the low value of home and family inherent in our cash-is-king Western society. It echoes our society of piglets scrambling for a place at the trough, rather than the newness of life "in Christ".

Even sadder watching men seek biblical mandate for overbearing bossiness that the pagans of our world have learned to reject! Do such men fear the wisdom and the strength of their wives so much that they forget the example of their Lord?

Wouldn’t it be wonderful if in Church and family, instead of scrambling for our place at the trough, we all discovered the innovations that the liberty of the gospel brings to our life together. If offers of mutual service in Christ (and in imitation of Christ) replaced, standing on our rights.

 

This article is part of the "Electric Angels" collection

It is the sixth of a series about Men & Women, Sex & God

Next: Falsifying the Word of God

 

© Tim Bulkeley, 1996-2002

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